13 July 2007

Condiments

"The young are violent because they have no inner life. And they have no inner life because they have no thoughts. And they have no thoughts because they know no words. And they know no words because they never speak. And they never speak because the music's too loud."
~ Quentin Crisp

"The Dunning-Kruger effect is the phenomenon whereby people who have little knowledge systematically think that they know more than others who have much more knowledge."

Visit the "Alternative Photography" site's gallery to see Karl P. Koenig's "gumoil" photographs, Walter Crump's pinhole photographs, and Keith Gerling's gum bichromates, as well as works by other artists.

ketchup
1711, from Malay kichap, from Chinese (Amoy dial.) koechiap "brine of fish." Catsup (earlier catchup) is a failed attempt at Anglicization, still in use in U.S. Originally a fish sauce, early English recipes included among their ingredients mushrooms, walnuts, cucumbers, and oysters. Modern form of the sauce began to emerge when U.S. seamen added tomatoes.

* Sure enough, my bottle of Heinz is labeled not merely "Ketchup" but "Tomato Ketchup."

mustard
1190, from O.Fr. moustarde, from moust "must," from L. mustum "new wine" (short for vinum mustum "fresh wine," neut. of mustus "fresh, new"); so called because it was originally prepared by adding must to the ground seeds of the plant to make a paste.

* Now I am sorely tempted to make my own... Where can I find some new wine?

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